Mega Vote January 9, 2017

In this MegaVote for New York’s 25th Congressional District:

Recent Congressional Votes

  • Senate: Fiscal 2017 Budget Resolution-Motion to Proceed
  • House: Objecting to the United Nations Security Council Resolution Vote 2334 Concerning Israeli-Palestinian Peace
  • House: Executive Regulations
  • House: Midnight Rules

Upcoming Congressional Bills

  • Senate: Fiscal 2017 Budget Resolution
  • House: Regulatory Accountability
  • House: Private Market Investors
  • House: Commodity Futures Trading Commission Reauthorization
  • House: Securities and Exchange Commission Cost-Benefit Analyses
  • House: Fiscal 2017 Budget Resolution

Recent Senate Votes
Fiscal 2017 Budget Resolution-Motion to Proceed – Vote Agreed to (51-48, 1 Not Voting)

The Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to the measure allowing for Senate debate on the concurrent resolution itself. The legislation would trigger the budget reconciliation process and enable the subsequent consideration of reconciliation legislation to repeal major portions of the 2010 health law. The measure would provide instructions to two Senate and two House committees to cut a minimum of $1 billion each during the next 10 years as part of budget reconciliation.

Sen. Charles Schumer voted NO
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand voted NO


Recent House Votes
Objecting to the United Nations Security Council Resolution Vote 2334 Concerning Israeli-Palestinian Peace – Vote Passed (342-80, 4 Present, 7 Not Voting)

The House agreed to this resolution which would express the sense of the House that the adoption of United Nations Security Council Resolution 2334, which criticized Israel for its continued expansion of settlements in occupied territories, and which the United States abstained from vetoing in the Security Council, undermined the long-standing position of the United States to oppose and veto U.N. Security Council resolutions that seek to impose solutions to Israeli-Palestinian final status issues, or that are one-sided and anti-Israel.

Rep. Louise Slaughter voted NO


Executive Regulations – Vote Passed (237-187, 9 Not Voting)

The House passed a bill that would modify the federal rule-making process by preventing “major rules”, those generally having an annual economic impact greater than $100 million, from being implemented unless Congress enacts legislation approving them.

Rep. Louise Slaughter voted NO


Midnight Rules – Vote Passed (238-184, 11 Not Voting)

The House passed legislation that would permit a new Congress to use the Congressional Review Act to disapprove, en bloc, multiple regulations issued by a president in his final year in office, rather than just a single regulation at a time for rules issued during the final 60 session days of the previous Congress.

Rep. Louise Slaughter voted NO


Upcoming Votes
Fiscal 2017 Budget Resolution – SCONRES3

The concurrent resolution would trigger the budget reconciliation process and enable the subsequent consideration of reconciliation legislation to repeal major portions of the 2010 health law. The measure would provide instructions to two Senate and two House committees to cut a minimum of $1 billion each during the next 10 years as part of budget reconciliation.



Regulatory Accountability – HR5

The bill would modify the federal rule-making process with a focus on reducing the possible economic costs of federal regulations, allow more legal challenges to rules and increase transparency. Among its provisions, it would require agencies to estimate the cost of proposed regulations and consider lower-cost alternatives, creating additional steps that agencies must follow when proposing “major” or “high impact” rules, including an opportunity for the public to challenge agency justifications and findings. It also automatically postpones the implementation of new federal rules costing $1 billion or more until all legal challenges are resolved.



Private Market Investors – HR79

The bill would expand the circumstances under which events where businesses offer unregistered securities in the private market would not be considered “general solicitations” that otherwise require the issuer to verify that the individuals attending the events are accredited investors.



Commodity Futures Trading Commission Reauthorization – HR238

The bill would reauthorize Commodity Futures Trading Commission operations through Fiscal 2021 and amends the 2010 Dodd-Frank Act to modify and clarify how the agency is to regulate derivatives and swaps. Among its provisions, it would ease certain regulatory requirements to ensure that some “end users” of derivatives (such as farmers and utilities that use derivatives to hedge market risk) are not regulated as swaps dealers and would require the agency to conduct cost-benefit analyses of its proposed rules.



Securities and Exchange Commission Cost-Benefit Analyses – HR78

The bill would require the Securities and Exchange Commission to conduct cost-benefit analyses of new regulatory proposals and existing rules and to modify or rescind those found to have a negative impact.



Fiscal 2017 Budget Resolution – SCONRES3

The chamber may take up a measure after expected Senate adoption that would trigger the budget reconciliation process and enable the subsequent consideration of reconciliation legislation to repeal major portions of the 2010 health law. The legislation would provide instructions to two Senate and two House committees to cut a minimum of $1 billion each during the next 10 years as part of budget reconciliation.

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